The leaking 'Superior Sheds' shed
Saturday, 02 April 2011
As I previously posted a few years ago, the shed I purchased from (not so) Superior Sheds leaks like I sieve.  After repeated attempts to get the company to stand behind their product, I think I finally have the issue under control - since I fixed it myself.

 

If you own one of these 'inferior sheds' and are having a problem with leaks the issue is probably the sheeters - the screws used to attach the metal roof to the rafters.

My best guess at what happens is that the screws the company used are inferior and were not installed properly.

As is expected with a metal shed in Florida things expand and contract a lot.  The expansion and contraction allows the screw to slightly loosen, water starts to penetrate, and the poorly galvanized screws rust.  Eventually the screw rusts so much that water just starts to pour in.  The result:  about 100 holes in a shed that leak.

Every screw I pulled out of the roof was completely rotten.  On a couple, the shank completely snapped since it was rusted. 

These screws have a rubber washer on them that is supposed to seal the screw to the roof and keep things tight.  However if the screw is not installed correctly by either under-tightening, or over tightening and stripping out the hole, that rubber washer never has a chance.  It is interesting to note that about 10 screws on this shed have never leaked.  They are on 2 rafters on the end - as if someone different installed those than the rest of the shed.

The fix is not simple and takes a bit of time.  The first thing you'll need to do is buy a box of new sheeters (screws with rubber washers).  If you can, try to get some about 1/2 inch longer that what is already installed - the wood rafter is most likely soft and the extra length may get you into some better wood.  Grab a couple of tubes of caulk the same color as your roof while you are at it.

Remember, there is not much holding up that metal roof, so when you climb up there do so VERY gently.  I don't recommend standing at all.  Instead sit directly over a rafter and 'scootch' over to where you need to work.  

Remove a screw -  you should only do one at a time to prevent the roof from shifting while working on it.  Clean the area around the hole with a damp paper towel.  Clean is good since it will allow the caulk to hold that much better.  Press down the roof over the hole, and force the caulk into it (and into the wood).  Leave a nice blob on top of the hole.  Grab a new screw and install it.  This is the tricky part:  You need to get it tight enough to seal, but if you over tighten - which is going to be easy since the wood is wet and soft - you'll have a bigger problem. Now take your finger and work the blob over the screw.  Repeat until all the screws are done.  

Good luck!